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Home » Company » Our History

Our History

In October 2008, PepsiCo Canada's businesses reorganized into two business units - PepsiCo Beverages Canada, which includes brands such as Pepsi, Gatorade and Tropicana; and PepsiCo Foods Canada, which includes Frito Lay Canada and Quaker foods & snacks. In 2010, PepsiCo Canada merged its beverage bottling and brand business operations, forming one unified Canadian beverage organization – PepsiCo Beverages Canada.

Learn more about our history below.

PepsiCo Beverages Canada

Pepsi History in Canada

The Pepsi Brand's first expansion outside the USA occurred on June 12, 1934, with the opening of a bottling plant in Montreal (Quebec). We were able to expand into Canada after franchise territory rights were granted to Franchise-Owned Bottling Operations (FOBOs). More than 80 FOBOs were approved, with each being responsible for the bottling, distribution and selling of Pepsi products in their defined territory under a contract called the Exclusive Bottling Appointment (EBA).

Many of these FOBOs embraced our Pepsi brand as their own and it quickly became an integral part of their communities - creating a solid foundation for our future success as a market leader in Canada.

In the 1980s a consolidation of FOBOs occurred, culminating in 1990 when PepsiCo Canada acquired a number of them. From there the bottling business was spun off into The Pepsi Bottling Group in 1999. This continued for a full decade until 2009 when PepsiCo, Inc., announced its plan to acquire back all of the outstanding shares of The Pepsi Bottling Group in Canada.

In 1986, PepsiCo, Inc., acquired the 7UP brand from Phillip Morris worldwide (excluding the USA), thereby gaining the popular lemon-lime carbonated soft drink position in Canada and boosting our company to its market leader position in retail stores.

Currently 88% of Canadian sales of Pepsi beverages flow through The Pepsi Bottling Group and 12% via 13 remaining FOBOs.

Aggressive Marketing Campaigns Over the Decades Were Hallmark of Pepsi Brand
Over the years, the Pepsi brand has always been motivated to push the envelope for more aggressive marketing and merchandising campaigns. This started with the "Twice as much, for a nickel too" campaign in the 1930s, followed by the first-ever radio jingle with "Pepsi Pete" singing "Pepsi Cola hits the spot" in 1939.

Other noteworthy campaign highlights included:

• A lower sugar Pepsi in the early 1950s, under the slogan of "Pepsi, the light refreshment"

• Later in the 1950s, "Make friends with Pepsi", "Be young, be fair, be debonair, be sociable, have a Pepsi."

• In the 70s, "You've got a lot to live and Pepsi's got a lot to give."

• In 1976, the Pepsi Brand took the unprecedented, bold step of issuing The Pepsi Challenge. Pepsi market share quickly jumped dramatically.

• This was followed by "Look who's drinking Pepsi now!"

• The "Pepsi Generation" campaign drew lots of attention in the 1970s and in the 1980s was relaunched as "The Choice of a New Generation" featuring music superstars, including Michael Jackson.

As consumers began to look for more variety in their beverage choices, we responded by adding Tropicana in 1998 and Quaker and Gatorade in 2001 to our offering through strategic acquisitions. Following these additions, the Pepsi-Cola Canada beverage division was merged with the new businesses and re-named Pepsi-QTG Canada. In 2008, PepsiCo Canada's businesses were again reorganized and the business unit PepsiCo Beverages Canada was formed. In 2010, PepsiCo Canada merged its beverage bottling and brand business operations, forming one unified Canadian beverage organization – PepsiCo Beverages Canada.

Tropicana History in Canada

1947 Tropicana was founded in 1947 by Anthony Rossi as a Florida fruit packaging business. The company entered the concentrate orange juice business in 1949, registering Tropicana as a trade-mark in the US.

1954 Rossi pioneered a pasteurization process for orange juice. For the first time, consumers could enjoy the fresh taste of pure not-from-concentrate 100% Florida orange juice in a ready-to-serve package. The juice, Tropicana Pure Premium, became the company's flagship product.

1957 Company changed name to Tropicana Products, Inc., headquartered in Bradenton, Florida. The SS Tropicana begins sailing weekly to New York to deliver 5.7 Million Litres a week of Tropicana Pure Premium juice to the Northeast U.S.

1965 Tropicana received its first international order for 14,000 cases of Tropicana Orange Juice, and France was the first country outside the U.S. to enjoy Tropicana.

1970 Tropicana began operations of the "Great White Train", the first unit train (that is, a train carrying a single commodity) in the history of the food industry, later painted orange to better advertise its cargo. The train began delivering the freshest product at the lowest cost to the Northeast U.S.

1978 Tropicana was sold to Beatrice Foods Co.

1988 Tropicana was sold to The Seagram Company Ltd.

1991 Tropicana brand launched in Canada as Canada's first Not from Concentrate Orange Juice and Not from Concentrate Grapefruit Juice.

1996 Tropicana Tropics juice blend was launched in Canada.

1997 Tropicana brand reached $100 million US in Sales.

1998 PepsiCo, Inc., purchased the Tropicana brand.

1999 Tropicana Calcium Supplement (fortified orange juice), requiring the innovative use of a Drug Identification Number, was launched in Canada.

2001 Quaker Tropicana Gatorade Canada (QTG Canada) formed as a merger of equals on August 8, 2001.

2004 QTG Canada merged with the Pepsi-Cola Canada beverage business to form the Pepsi QTG Canada division.

2008 PepsiCo Canada's businesses were reorganized and the business unit, PepsiCo Beverages Canada, was formed.

2010 PepsiCo Canada merged its beverage bottling and brand business operations, forming one unified Canadian beverage organization – PepsiCo Beverages Canada.

Gatorade History in Canada

1967 Scientists at the University of Florida tested the Gatorade brand on 10 members of the freshman football team in an effort to prevent cramping and dehydration caused by hot weather and physical exertion. The University of Florida Gators became known as the "second-half team" because of their ability to dominate opponents in the third and fourth quarters, and won the Orange Bowl. The Georgia Tech coach was quoted in Sports Illustrated as saying, "We didn't have Gatorade...that made the difference".

1967 Stokely-Van Camp acquired the rights to produce and sell Gatorade throughout the United States.

1968 Gatorade became a fixture on the NFL sidelines.

1983 The Quaker Oats Company acquired Stokely-Van Camp, including the Gatorade Thirst Quencher brand.

1986 Gatorade was introduced into Canada in the original Lemon Lime and Orange flavours.

1988 The Gatorade Company established the Gatorade Sports Science Institute in Barrington, Illinois, in an effort to provide valuable scientific research and education in the areas of exercise, sports science and nutrition. The Institute conducts research and develops education materials for sports health professionals around the world.

1999 Gatorade brand surpassed $1 Billion US in Sales for the first time. Gatorade Brand signed Toronto Raptor Vince Carter as spokesman.

2001 PepsiCo, Inc., acquired The Quaker Oats Company, including the Gatorade brand, in August.

2001 Quaker Tropicana Gatorade Canada (QTG Canada) formed as a merger of equals on August 8, 2001.

2004 QTG Canada merged with the Pepsi-Cola Canada beverage business to form the Pepsi-QTG Canada division.

2008 PepsiCo Canada's businesses were reorganized and the business unit, PepsiCo Beverages Canada, was formed.

2010 PepsiCo Canada merged its beverage bottling and brand business operations, forming one unified Canadian beverage organization – PepsiCo Beverages Canada.

PepsiCo Foods Canada

Frito Lay Canada History

The Hostess Company had its beginning in 1935 in Breslau, a small village in Waterloo County, Ontario, when a young farmer began cooking potato chips on his mother's kitchen stove. Little did he realize that the finest potato chip manufacturing operation in Canada was to grow from this humble beginning. The youth's name was Edward Snyder; the company he founded became known as "Hostess."

In its early years, the future of the potato chip industry was not always bright. In the late 1930s, however, the industry began to prosper because of advances in science, the implementation of new sanitary techniques, and the introduction of modern equipment. By the 1950s, the industry experienced tremendous growth in response to increased interest in snack foods.

In 1954, Mr. Snyder sold his company to E.W. Vanstone, who envisioned an expansion program for the chip company. Mr. Vanstone guided the business through a large part of the expansion program before selling his interest in Hostess to General Foods in 1958.

A partnership to distribute snack foods developed between Hostess Food Products and Frito Lay Canada in 1987 and the merger was completed in 1988. The new organization was known as the "The Hostess Frito-Lay Company".

In 1992, Frito Lay acquired the joint venture, but retained the Hostess Frito Lay name. Today, Frito Lay Canada and its sister company, Frito-Lay, Inc., operate as the North American arm of Frito-Lay North America, Inc., which is the domestic and international packaged foods business of PepsiCo, Inc.

In 2008 PepsiCo Canada's businesses reorganized and Frito Lay Canada and Quaker came together to form one unified foods organization called PepsiCo Foods Canada.

To learn more about the history of Frito-Lay click here.

Quaker History in Canada

1850 Ferdinand Schumacher founds German Mills American Cereal Company in Akron, OH. During the same period, John Stuart established the North Star Mills Company in Canada.

1877 The Quaker brand became the first trade-mark registered for a breakfast cereal. The trade-mark was registered with the U.S. Patent and Trade-mark Office as "a figure of a man in Quaker branded garb." Both former owners, Henry Seymour and William Heston, claimed to have selected the Quaker name as a symbol of good quality and honest value.

1881 Henry Parsons Crowell bought the bankrupt Quaker Mill in Ravenna, OH, and its most important asset – the brand name Quaker.

1902 The major Canadian production facility for Quaker Oats was located in Peterborough (Ontario) on the shores of the Otonabee River.

1916 The Peterborough Plant was destroyed by fire, which tragically claimed the lives of 22 employees.

1918 The Peterborough Plant reconstruction was completed and operations were restored.

1943 Canadian subsidiary to the U.S. Company was incorporated under the name "The Quaker Oats Company of Canada Limited".

1980 Investment added the production of cookie, cake and muffin mixes to the Peterborough plant.

1988 The Peterborough Plant went through a major expansion with new state-of-the-art manufacturing equipment for Quaker Ready-To-Eat Cereal products (Quaker Life, Quaker Oat Bran, Quaker Corn Bran and Quaker Squares), previously imported from the US.

1996 Investment transformed an existing building in Trenton (Ontario) into a Rice Cake manufacturing facility.

1998 Crispy Minis rice chips, a Canadian developed product, launched and quickly became one of the most successful Quaker products ever (now available in Canada, the U.S. and UK).

2001 PepsiCo, Inc., acquired The Quaker Oats Company in August, 2001. Quaker Tropicana Gatorade Canada (QTG Canada) formed as a merger of equals on August 8, 2001.

2004 QTG Canada merged with the Pepsi-Cola Canada beverage business to form the Pepsi-QTG Canada division.

2006 The Peterborough plant was certified as a Peanut-Free facility, and Canada's first Peanut-Free granola bars (7 flavours) under the Quaker Chewy brand became available.

2008 PepsiCo Canada's businesses reorganize and Frito Lay Canada and Quaker come together to form one unified foods organization called PepsiCo Foods Canada.

To learn more about the history of the Quaker brand click here.

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